New Podcast: Polly Atkin on the Places of Her Poetry


Polly Atkin published her first full length poetry collection, Basic Nest Architecture, in 2017. Like her two pamphlets before it – bone song (2008) and Shadow Dispatches (2013) – Basic Nest Architecture won critical acclaim, including New Writing North’s Andrew Waterhouse Prize. Suzannah V. Evans chatted with Polly about the roots of her poetic life in places like Cumbria, where she now lives, as well as within the StAnza poetry festival, where this interview was recorded.

They discussed the process of building poems and the aural and visual qualities of poetic language. They also delved into Polly’s sources of inspiration, whether the ongoing influence of the Romantic poets, or how as a poet Polly thrives within a community, both amid the bustle of a poetry festival and through the chatter of social media (where she tweets as @pollyrowena).

Photograph of the sea and city of St Andrews, with a quotation from Polly Atkin: "I’m really interested in the soundscapes of daily life and how we live, and so there’s a lot of buzzing and humming and things in my work."
Photo credit: Suzannah V. Evans

Polly reads two of her poems at the end, ‘The Glorious Fellowship of Migraineurs’, and ‘When I lived Alone’, from her collection Basic Nest Architecturepublished by Seren Books.


About the Author

Suzannah V. Evans is a poet, editor, and critic. Her writing has appeared in the TLS, The London Magazine, Eborakon, The North, Coast to Coast to Coast, Time Present, New Welsh Review, and elsewhere. She is Reviews Editor for The Compass and an AHRC Northern Bridge doctoral student at Durham University, where she runs the T. S. Eliot reading group and The Poetry Podcast.

Advertisements

What do you think? Share your thoughts below.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: