Polar Peter: J. M Barrie and the influence of Children’s Literature on Robert Scott’s Antarctic Adventures (Public talk, 18th November)


Scott's party on the South Pole expedition, by Henry Bowers (1883–1912) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Scott’s party on the South Pole expedition, by Henry Bowers (1883–1912) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

As he lay dying in the Antarctic ice Captain Robert F. Scott wrote to his friend, author and playwright J.M. Barrie saying “I never met a man in my life whom I admired and loved more than you.” Barrie reportedly kept this letter written on “little flimsy sheets” with him for the rest of his life. A free public talk will outline the impact of this unlikely friendship on one of Britain’s great adventurers. Join Sinead Moriarty on 18th November at 13.00 in Palace Green Library.

When Scott wrote these words at the end of 1912 he had known the author of Peter Pan for just 6 years, and yet their relationship had a significant impact on the explorer and can be seen to have helped to shape the way Scott understood and narrated his own Antarctic experiences. This presentation will examine the relationship between Scott and Barrie, and the impact of Barrie, and children’s literature more broadly, on Scott’s Terra Nova narrative, and on the children’s literature written about this expedition.

This is a free event, and there is no need to book. This talk forms part of the ongoing exhibition Antarctica: Explorers, Heroes, Scientists.

AntarcticaTitles_Large

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